acceptance, Childhood Cancer, coronavirus, Parenting, Uncategorized

Living with uncertainty in the time of the coronavirus

The Buffalo News published one of my essays today. It parallels the country’s reaction to COVID-19 with my daughter’s leukemia diagnosis, and how we can utilize long-term thinking strategies for dealing with the related anxiety.

MY VIEW

Living with uncertainty in age of coronavirus

Over the last week, a feeling of apprehension has swept over the country. With the coronavirus infecting thousands of Americans and cities taking drastic measures to slow the spread, citizens rush to combat this pandemic. We scramble for some sense of control, bury our fears and hope that life will soon return to normal.

It won’t.

The current reaction to COVID-19 reminds me of how I felt six years ago when my daughter…

Click here to read the entire piece.

books, Uncategorized

Snow Day: a modern Hansel and Gretel tale

It may be fall, but Snow Day is now available! This is my latest book for Teacher Created Materials, and it was a blast to write. Because it’s based on my actual children and Buffalo weather, this one’s even more special to me. Here’s the overview:

Snow Day
snow_day
This early chapter book features full-color illustrations to capture the attention of 4th-6th grade children who enjoy modern retellings of classic tales. In this spin on Hansel and Gretel, Lia and Tim are playing outside on a snow day when they get lost in the woods. They find a candy shop owned by the mysterious Mr. Gretel, who gives them as much candy as they can eat. But they’ll have to rely on their own smarts when it comes to getting home! Kids will be captivated by this fast-paced adventure story that appeals to reluctant readers.

Should you read it, or any of my work, I’d love to hear your reactions.

 

Children with Incarcerated Parents, Criminal Justice, Parenting, Uncategorized

Visiting Prison: The Endless Wait

I published an essay with The Osborne Association as part of their #SeeUsSupportUs campaign.

This one’s about the degrading treatment one receives when visiting a loved one in prison. If you haven’t joined #SeeUsSupportUs already, please consider doing so to support families coping with having an incarcerated loved one.

7BD22BD2-B4E1-C273-C0D3E39E6F5C0555

Here’s the beginning of the essay:

I got the feeling nobody wanted to be at Clinton Correctional Facility in the summer of 2003. Not the guards. Not the incarcerated. Certainly not me. Yet my sister and I drove there for the weekend because we wanted to see our dad for the first time in years.

The Sunday of that visit, we arrived at 7:45am in hopes of getting in at 8:30—we had a seven-hour drive back to Buffalo and wanted to leave by noon. We received visitor pass #56.

There were no signs telling us where to go, where to wait, what to do. Just a room of silent women, some with children, some itching to go outside and smoke.

To read the rest, go to http://www.osborneny.org/news/voices-from-see-us-support-us-pamela-brunskill/.

 

Children with Incarcerated Parents, Criminal Justice, Uncategorized

Family Separation Because of Incarceration and Detention at the Border Is Taking a Toll on Children

“Whether separated due to immigration or incarceration, these children are in limbo.”

I have a new article on Teen Vogue this week that compares the long-term effects the trauma children at the border are facing to the trauma children with incarcerated parents face. Can the empathy shown towards children at the border be extended to children with incarcerated parents?

Click here to read the article!

author_default